Naming the Crisis

The important thing to understand is that the atrocities our nation is now committing at the border don’t represent an overreaction or poorly implemented response to some actual problem that needs solving. There is no immigration crisis; there is no crisis of immigrant crime. No, the real crisis is an upsurge in hatred — unreasoning hatred that bears no relationship to anything the victims have done.

– Paul Krugman “Return of the Blood Libel” (6-21-2018)

This week’s featured posts are “Family Separations: Should we be horrified, relieved, or just confused?” and “You can’t compromise with bullshit“.

This week everybody was still talking about immigration

At times it was hard to remember that anything else was going on. On the other hand, when your country starts talking about opening concentration camps, maybe that deserves some public attention. Jesse Hawken pointed out how the national conversation has evolved since the 2016 campaign:

2016: “Come on, you’re talking like Trump’s going to put people in concentration camps”

2018: “First of all, I think it’s offensive that you refer to them as ‘concentration camps'”

Anyway, the “Family Separations” post deals directly with the immigration issue, and “You can’t compromise with bullshit” was largely inspired by it.

and two cracks in the Republican wall

All along, the question facing anti-Trump Republicans has been: “Yes, but are you going to do anything?” So far, their responses have mostly been disappointing: A few congressional Republicans will tut-tut a little, and then back Trump when their votes are needed, including backing him in his effort to discredit the Mueller investigation. During the election, conservative columnists groused about their situation, but most ultimately called for an anti-Hillary vote, even if they couldn’t bring themselves to endorse Trump.

But this week, two well-known anti-Trump Republicans, George Will and Steve Schmidt, both renounced their party and called for voters to elect Democrats this fall.

In an article titled “Vote against the GOP this November“, veteran Washington Post columnist George Will castigated the Republican majorities in Congress for failing to put any checks on President Trump.

The congressional Republican caucuses must be substantially reduced. So substantially that their remnants, reduced to minorities, will be stripped of the Constitution’s Article I powers that they have been too invertebrate to use against the current wielder of Article II powers.

In particular, he denounced Paul Ryan, who has “traded his political soul for … a tax cut. … Ryan and many other Republicans have become the president’s poodles.”

Schmidt, manager of John McCain’s 2008 presidential campaign, withdrew “my membership in the Republican Party. It is fully the party of Trump.”  In a lengthy tweet-storm, he called for Democratic majorities in Congress.

Our country is in trouble. Our politics are badly broken. The first step to a season of renewal in our land is the absolute and utter repudiation of Trump and his vile enablers in the 2018 election by electing Democratic majorities. I do not say this as an advocate of a progressive agenda. I say it as someone who retains belief in DEMOCRACY and decency.

The current scandal of separating refugee families seems to be the straw that broke the camel’s back.

[President Reagan] would be ashamed of McConnell and Ryan and all the rest while this corrupt government establishes internment camps for babies. Every one of these complicit leaders will carry this shame through history. … Today the GOP has become a danger to our democracy and values. This Independent voter will be aligned with the only party left in America that stands for what is right and decent and remains fidelitous to our Republic, objective truth, the rule of law and our Allies. That party is the Democratic Party.

I doubt that either man has a large following in today’s Republican Party. Their statements are important, though, as cover for long-time Republican voters who see no place for themselves in the corrupt and heartless Party of Trump, but still aren’t comfortable voting for Democrats. They need to understand that they will never get back the Republican Party they have loved unless Trump and his “poodles” lose.

I’ve seen a few reactions like “It took you long enough” or blaming Schmidt for putting us on this road by elevating Sarah Palin, and so on. None of that is false, but this isn’t the way to greet defectors. The more defectors, the better. Pressure should be on the most anti-Trump Republican who hasn’t called for a Democratic victory yet, not on the one who just did.


The leaders of Republican Majority for Choice also announced that they were leaving the party. This is a little less shocking, because it is so overdue. Susan Bevan and Susan Cullman seem to be the last people to realize that the GOP has no place for pro-choice activists.

but I got something wrong last week

Last week I falsely attributed a white supremacist quote by Richard Spencer to White House Advisor Stephen Miller. It was an honest, sloppy mistake: The Vanity Fair article I linked to was about Miller, but it quoted Spencer, attributing the quote to “he”. I was reading too quickly and thought “he” referred to Miller, which it obviously didn’t on closer examination. (No fault to VF.) Thanks to commenter Mark Flaherty for catching the misattribution. I removed the quote as soon as I realized my error.

and you also might be interested in …

Turkey, our NATO ally, took another step towards authoritarianism. President Erdogan won Sunday’s election, in spite of some polls that indicated he might be in trouble. So far, I’m not seeing accusations of fraud.


As I’ve been predicting, Republicans are responding to the budget deficit their tax cut created by calling for cuts in Medicare. They want you to pay more for medical care when you get old, so that rich people and multinational corporations and Donald Trump can pay lower taxes. It’s a more-or-less direct transfer of wealth from you to them.


Josh Marshall’s critique of Trump’s negotiating style is worth a read. Basically, he is building on a point made several other places, including the NYT and the Calculated Risk economics blog: You have to negotiate differently when you’re going to face the same players in future deals. In one-time deals, like on a used-car lot, you can get an advantage through bluffing, lying, and threats (like the threat to walk away). But situations where you are bound to the other party in some way (union/management, or any firm with its major clients and suppliers) call for a whole different toolkit, because you’re not just trying to grind the other party into the dust, you need to build trust, and work towards mutually beneficial agreements that continue into the future.

If you’re going to be dealing with the same players again and again, using threats or bad faith to make a one-sided deal really isn’t necessarily in your longterm interest. Because you’re going to have to deal with that cheated player again.

When we deal with allies like Canada or Germany, or even with rivals like China or Russia, the point isn’t to make a one-time “great deal” and walk away with the profit. Because unless we conquer the world, we’ll have to keep going back to these same players and making new deals.


The Washington Post’s editorial board points out something else about Trump’s international trade negotiations: You can’t fight a trade war against the whole world at the same time.

The U.S. position regarding China would be stronger if Beijing faced a united front that also included Europe, Japan, Mexico and Canada. As it is, Mr. Trump is threatening them with large tariffs as well, driving them to explore closer relations with Beijing.

and let’s close with something spiritual

I think I’ve linked to this meditation video before, but repetition is part of any good spiritual practice. This seems like a particularly good week for this practice.

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Comments

  • Michael Wells  On June 25, 2018 at 4:30 pm

    Of what value is the number of public Republicans who repudiate Trump, whom you call “defectors.” You say “…but this isn’t the way to greet defectors. The more defectors, the better.” How so? You admit that neither (Will or Schmidt) have any following in the Republican Party but claim that their public statements would serve “as cover for long-time Republican voters who see no place for themselves” in that party. If there are any “persuadable” Trump voters, they have had more than sufficient evidence to convince them that they made a huge mistake should they actually want to look at any of that evidence. Your claim also assumes that there is some “traditional” Republican Party. There hasn’t been since Reagan was elected. The current party is merely the terminal stage of the disease from the 1980s.

  • Robert Cook  On June 25, 2018 at 6:52 pm

    Hey Bro, Good week in review here. Check out the meditation at the end. Love, Bro

    Please forgive the brevity of this response. It was typed on a tiny keyboard & sent from my iPhone.

    >

  • Abby  On June 26, 2018 at 12:31 am

    “But situations where you are bound to the other party in some way (union/management, or any firm with its major clients and suppliers) call for a whole different toolkit, because you’re not just trying to grind the other party into the dust, you need to build trust, and work towards mutually beneficial agreements that continue into the future.” You just explained why he can’t stay married!

  • knb  On July 2, 2018 at 9:21 am

    Re: the cracks in the Republican wall: I don’t think that we should be giving people grief for not defecting sooner, but I’m not particularly optimistic about the effect that it will have either. There was a list of prominent Republicans who announced that they were voting for Clinton, but Trump won anyway.

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